Academia And Research

Future Everything

FutureEverything is an internationally recognised R&D hub for digital culture, and we present industry conferences, innovation projects, artworks and live experiences which showcase a digital future.

Fab Academy

The Fab Academy is a Digital Fabrication Program directed by Neil Gershenfeld of MIT’s Center For Bits and Atoms and based on MIT’s rapid prototyping course, MAS 863: How to Make (Almost) Anything. The Fab Academy began as an outreach project from the CBA, and has since spread to Fab Labs around the world. The program provides advanced digital fabrication instruction for students through an unique, hands-on curriculum and access to technological tools and resources.

Fab Lab Barcelona

A fab lab (fabrication laboratory) is a small-scale workshop offering (personal) digital fabrication. A fab lab is generally equipped with an array of flexible computer controlled tools that cover several different length scales and various materials, with the aim to make "almost anything". This includes technology-enabled products generally perceived as limited to mass production. Fab Labs are community-driven and community-focus. Knowledge sharing is fostered through face-to-face interaction and through the webpage.

Actipedia

Actipedia is an open-access, user-generated database of creative activism. It’s a place to share, read about, and comment upon experiences and examples of how activists and artists are using creative tactics and strategies to challenge power and offer visions of a better society.

Zooniverse

The Zooniverse is now one million strong. That’s one million registered volunteers – so in fact many more people have taken part without logging in too. The Zooniverse started less than 7 years ago with the launch of Galaxy Zoo. We have since created almost 30 citizen science projects from astronomy to zoology. Some of you have been with us from the very start, some have only joined this week. Either way, we are constantly amazed by the effort that the community puts into our projects.

Spam Attacks

We propose a decentralized privacy-preserving approach to spam filtering. Our solution exploits robust digests to identify messages that are a slight variation of one another and a peer-to-peer architecture between mail servers to collaboratively share knowledge about spam

Diaspora*

Diaspora (currently styled diaspora* and formerly styled DIASPORA*) is a nonprofit, user-owned, distributed social network that is based upon the free Diaspora software. Diaspora consists of a group of independently owned pods which interoperate to form the network. As of September 2013, there were estimated to be more than 405,000 Diaspora accounts

P2P-Next

The P2P-Next integrated project will build a next generation Peer-to-Peer (P2P) content delivery platform, to be designed, developed, and applied jointly by a consortium consisting of high-profile academic and industrial players with proven track records in innovation and commercial success

Tribler

Tribler is an open source peer-to-peer decentralized client with various features for watching videos online. The user interface of Tribler is very basic and focused on ease of use, instead of diversity of features. Tribler is based on the BitTorrent protocol and uses an overlay network for content searching, which makes the program operate independent of external websites and renders it immune to limiting external action, for example, government restraint. Due to this overlay network Tribler does not require an external website or indexing service to discover content.

Usenet

Usenet is a worldwide distributed Internet discussion system. It was developed from the general purpose UUCP dial-up network architecture. Duke University graduate students Tom Truscott and Jim Ellis conceived the idea in 1979 and it was established in 1980.[1] Users read and post messages (called articles or posts, and collectively termed news) to one or more categories, known as newsgroups. Usenet resembles a bulletin board system (BBS) in many respects, and is the precursor to Internet forums that are widely used today.

Pages

There are currently 383 Commons-Based Peer Production cases!